The Unemployed Librarian

Michael Rogowski, MLIS, HBA,

ex-tabulis:

Just a few of the librarians, archivists, and repositories that make an appearance in my “Librarians in pop culture” slideshow for our library’s ice cream social. Thanks, everyone, for the suggestions (they all made it in there, plus a ton more), and happy National Library Week!

you-wish-you-had-this-url asked: I've been seeing a lot of people talk about Gus sounding really pretentious in the movie, do you think he sounds pretentious?

fishingboatproceeds:

I mean, that scene is word-for-word from the book, so don’t blame the movie! :) Yes, Gus is super pretentious at the start of the story. it’s a character flaw.

Gus wants to have a big and important and remembered life, and so he acts like he imagines people who have such lives act. So he’s, like, says-soliloquy-when-he-means-monologue pretentious, which is the most pretentious variety of pretension in all the world.

And then his performative, over-the-top, hyper-self-aware pretentiousness must fall away for him to really connect to Hazel, just as her fear of being a grenade must fall away. That’s what the novel is about. That is its plot.

Gus must make the opposite of the traditional heroic journey—he must start out strong and end up weak in order to reimagine what constitutes a rich and well-lived life.

Basically, a 20-second clip from the first five minutes of a movie is not the movie.

(Standard acknowledgement here that I might be wrong, that I am inevitably defensive of TFIOS, that it has many flaws, that there’s nothing wrong with critical discussion, and that a strong case could be made that I should not insert myself into these conversations at all.)

New Benchmark!

You guys! Today I reached a new bench mark in followers! Over 400 of you wonderful people are following me!

That’s crazy! I can’t believe so many of you follow me even though I update so sporadically. Thanks! It’s really awesome that so many of you are interested in this little thing =D

Another #ReviewsdayTuesday! 
This time it’s one of my all time favourite books: The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. A library school friend recommended this book to me (And by recommend, I mean yelled at me every day until I read it) and for good reason. The narrative is brilliant, the characters are so real you can reach out and touch them, and the world is so welcoming you don’t realize just how wrapped up in it you are until days of reading have gone by. 
If you haven’t already, you need to read this book and its brilliant follow up: The Wise Man’s Fear. 

Another #ReviewsdayTuesday! 

This time it’s one of my all time favourite books: The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. A library school friend recommended this book to me (And by recommend, I mean yelled at me every day until I read it) and for good reason. The narrative is brilliant, the characters are so real you can reach out and touch them, and the world is so welcoming you don’t realize just how wrapped up in it you are until days of reading have gone by. 

If you haven’t already, you need to read this book and its brilliant follow up: The Wise Man’s Fear.